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LGBTQ Books in Middle School

I recently got a request for recommendations of LGBTQ books for middle school. Below I have compiled a list of books in my classroom library that prominently feature LGBTQ characters or themes.

Younger - The following books are geared towards younger students, but have some appeal for middle school students.

  • George, by Alex Gino - This book features a fourth grade transgender girl. Throughout the book, she becomes more comfortable with her own gender identity and starts to tell close family and friends her secret.

George-1

  • Princess Princess Ever After, by Katie O'Neill - This sweet graphic novel focuses on two princesses who must overthrow a jealous sorceress to regain a kingdom, and end up falling in love in the process. A great read that challenges gender stereotypes to boot.

Princess-Princess-Ever-After

  • Love, Penelope, by Joanne Rocklin - This book focuses on Penny, and her two mothers, and is told in a series of letters to Penny's unborn sibling.

Love-Penelope-2

Middle - The following books are appropriate for middle school students, often with themes about accepting others, coming to terms with your own identity, and being yourself.

  • The Prince and the Dressmaker, by Jen Wang - This excellent graphic novel tells the story of a prince who secretly dresses like a woman. It is a fantastic book about coming to terms with your own identity.

Prince-and-the-Dressmaker

  • Lumberjanes - A graphic novel series about a summer camp for hardcore lady types. It features a number of LGBTQ characters in heroic roles, and is highly entertaining.

Lumberjanes

  • The Other Boy, by M.G. Hennessey - A book about a transgender boy who loves playing baseball and making graphic novels. He faces a difficult situation when someone threatens to reveal his secret.

The-Other-Boy

  • Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World, by Ashley Herring Blake - Ivy's story is a compelling tale of a girl who is coming to terms with her feelings for her friend June. As she realizes the true extent of her crush, Ivy struggles with societal expectations, particularly worrying about her older sister's reaction.

Ivy-Aberdeen

  • See You at Harry's, by Jo Knowles - I haven't read this book, due to it reportedly being heartbreaking. That being said, it has excellent reviews and involves the main character's older brother coming out.

See-You-at-Harry-s

  • Posted, by John David Anderson - This is a beautiful book that focuses on the changing nature of friendship in middle school. A secondary character faces homophobic bullying later in the novel.

Posted

  • Lily and Dunkin, by Donna Gephart - A book that focuses on the developing friendship between Lily, a transgender girl, and Dunkin, a boy who has bipolar disorder. In particular, it focuses on Lily becoming more comfortable expressing her identity with her family and at school.

Lily-and-Dunkin-1

  • The 57 Bus, by Dashka Slater - A fascinating true story of two teenagers, Sasha and Richard, whose lives become linked after an incident on a bus in Oakland, California. Sasha is an agender teen whose skirt is set on fire, causing serious injury.

the-57-bus

  • The Lotterys Plus One, by Emma Donoghue - The story of the Lotterys, a family that consists of a gay couple, a lesbian couple, and their adopted and biological children. The family must adjust when a disapproving grandparent arrives to stay with them.

The-Lotterys-Plus-One

Mature - The following books are excellent for some middle school students, particularly older ones who need something a bit more challenging. Due to swearing and more mature themes, I keep these titles in my mature reads bin and sign them out to students after discussing the content with them.

  • Simon versus the Homo Sapiens Agenda, by Becky Albertalli - An excellent book about Simon, a closeted gay high school student, who must be the wingman for another student or risk being outed to the entire school.

Simon

  • Leah on the Offbeat, by Becky Albertalli - A sequel to Simon that I am currently reading (so it isn't actually on my classroom shelves just yet). It is about Simon's best friend Leah, who is bisexual and struggling to come out to her friends.

Leah-on-the-Offbeat

  • Spinning, by Tillie Walden - This graphic novel memoir recounts Tillie Walden's experiences as a figure skating competitor. The art is stunning and the story is fascinating, as she deals with loneliness, discovering her sexual identity, and outgrowing her sport. I'd add a trigger warning that it contains darker themes, particularly sexual assault, and is better for more mature readers.

Spinning

  • The Marrow Thieves, by Cherie Dimaline - In this futuristic novel, Indigenous people are hunted for their bone marrow, which contains the cure to the dreamlessness sweeping North America. In addition to being a powerful read about Indigenous rights, the main mentor figure in the book is gay and also fully accepted. (Thanks to Aaron Russell for reminding me of this title.)

The-Marrow-Thieves

I think this is a good start for LGBTQ representation in my classroom library, although I intend to keep adding titles as I come across more. In the mean time, I will display the books prominently in my classroom and give frequent book talks recommending the different titles. Hopefully, in doing so I can offer LGBTQ students characters that strike a chord with them, while promoting respect and diversity in my class.

Ellen Bees

Ellen Bees

I am a middle school teacher with a passion for sustainability and human rights. Opinions are my own.

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